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Thread: Wiring LED cup holders fuse

  1. Wiring LED cup holders fuse

    So I have my trunk wire all soldered together. What is adequate fuse to run the trunk in series with?


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  2. #2
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    High enough to carry the load but not exceed the capacity of the wire. Also, you dont want to run LEDs in series, it will greatly reduce their output.
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    Back in the good ol' days a 2006 22ve
    So I received a PM regarding series v's parallel. So to clear up any confusion, I snagged an image off the net real quick. I think seeing the circuits makes it easier. I know it seems that we might be wiring the LEDs in a series, but the terms "series" and "parallel" are technical terms and well defined in electrical circuits. When creating an electrical circuit, you can not substitute one for the other, without some predicted effected.

    Specifically to LEDs. A 12V ready LED has polarity. Meaning it has a designated + and-. This dictates they have to be wired in parallel. They will not light if in series.

    LEDs differ from plain old incandescent light bulbs. These do not have polarity and will light with which even terminal is connected to the + and -. Bulbs can be wired in series or parallel. Take a front and side marker setup on a car. Very common for them to be wired in series. Where as the brake light bulbs are likely in parallel.

    fig2_parallel-series-circuit-battery-light-bulbs.jpg
    Mikes Liquid Audio: Knowledge Experience Customer Service you can trust-KICKER WetSounds ACME props FlyHigh Custom Ballast Clarion LiquidLumens LEDs Roswell Wave Deflector And More

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    Quote Originally Posted by chpthril View Post
    So I received a PM regarding series v's parallel. So to clear up any confusion, I snagged an image off the net real quick. I think seeing the circuits makes it easier. I know it seems that we might be wiring the LEDs in a series, but the terms "series" and "parallel" are technical terms and well defined in electrical circuits. When creating an electrical circuit, you can not substitute one for the other, without some predicted effected.

    Specifically to LEDs. A 12V ready LED has polarity. Meaning it has a designated + and-. This dictates they have to be wired in parallel. They will not light if in series.

    LEDs differ from plain old incandescent light bulbs. These do not have polarity and will light with which even terminal is connected to the + and -. Bulbs can be wired in series or parallel. Take a front and side marker setup on a car. Very common for them to be wired in series. Where as the brake light bulbs are likely in parallel.

    fig2_parallel-series-circuit-battery-light-bulbs.jpg
    To add to mikes post, series circuits have the same current for each component and divides the voltage across the components. Parallel circuits have the same voltage on each component and divides the current.


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    Not to just beat the dead horse on electrical theory, BUT the other thing to remember about series connections.

    If you were to blow the filament in bulb 2 in Mikes acquired drawing bulb 3 would cease to function (open circuit) If you lost bulb 1, bulb 2 AND 3 wont light.

    Parallel allows you to lose a light and still retain function on other circuit loads.
    Last edited by freeheel4life; 03-15-2019 at 06:42 PM.

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    And all the above is why I pay someone to do my work. #Notamechanic #ijustdriveit

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bamer View Post
    To add to mikes post, series circuits have the same current for each component and divides the voltage across the components. Parallel circuits have the same voltage on each component and divides the current.


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    Just to clarify this, parallel circuits do not divide current. They multiply it. Each load that is added to the circuit will ask for more current from the source. This requires more planning to make sure the wiring and fuse can supply that current draw.

  8. #8
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    Wiring LED cup holders fuse

    Quote Originally Posted by UNSTUCK View Post
    Just to clarify this, parallel circuits do not divide current. They multiply it. Each load that is added to the circuit will ask for more current from the source. This requires more planning to make sure the wiring and fuse can supply that current draw.
    UNSTUCK is right: “Each load that is added to the circuit will ask for more current from the source. “

    I apologize if I mislead anyone, my use of divide was just an expression and not the algebraic usage. The correct algebraic terms to use would be addition and subtraction. See the two circuit laws that I was explaining using my watered down version.



    Hope this helps!


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    Last edited by Bamer; 03-16-2019 at 07:07 PM.

  9. #9
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    I always just find it easier to remember that adding loads in parallel will decrease total circuit resistance. Resistance goes down, current goes up. At least thats how I "learnt" it.

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