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View Full Version : How to perform a "quick winterization" (Marine Power engine)



Matt Garcia
01-08-2010, 08:38 PM
The following article will discuss how to remove drain plugs, knock sensors and a transmission cooler plug for Marine Power engines. * Doing this procedure drains water from the engine block and heater hoses which prevents water from freezing in the engine block during the winter months. Not removing water from the engine block could possibly crack the engine block.

If you are not comfortable with using this article as a “quick winterization” guide please take your Tigé to your nearest Tigé dealer. Not winterizing your boat properly could severly damage your engine.

The pictures below were taken from a Z1, RZ2 and 22Ve however the same should apply for recent Marine Power engines. Thank you for the members who contributed the images.

*Disclaimer: The following instructions are provided as a guide only. By following the instructions in this article, you are doing so at your own risk. TigéOwners.com, Tigé and the author of this article will not be held responsible for any damage that may occur to you or your boat as a result of the steps below.

* Note - I refer to this guide as a “quick winterization” as this only refers to draining the water from the engine. Some dealers or individuals prefer to fog the engine, add ant-freeze, remove and charge the batteries and put Stabil in the gas. I personally use this method since I take my boat out a few times during the winter months.

Tools Needed:

3/4 Wrench
7/16 Wrench
Flat head screw driver
Heater hose or something similar (old garden hose) (not required)


Time Involved :
20-30 Minutes

Step 1.
Removing drain plugs.
As illustrated in the picture below Marine Power engines have a total of 2 drain plugs (blue or silver colored) , 2 engine block plugs (knock sensors) and 1 transmission cooler plug. A total of 5 plugs will need to be removed.

http://www.tigeowners.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=18181&stc=1&d=1262915606


Step 2.
Starting on the port side unscrew the blue or silver drain plug. It does not matter which side you start on.

http://www.tigeowners.com/tech/images/drainplug.jpg


Step 3.
Next remove the connectors that are connected to the knock sensors. These just “snap” off. To remove them use your thumb and press down on the connector head then pull straight back. In the picture below this is the “white” connector attached to the knock sensor.

http://www.tigeowners.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=18180&stc=1&d=1262915588

http://www.tigeowners.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=17919&stc=1&d=1257810662

Step 4.
Use a 3/4” wrench and unscrew the knock sensor plug. In this case a short 3/4” wrench is best since it’s a tight fit.

http://www.tigeowners.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=18180&stc=1&d=1262915588

Step 5.
Moving on to the starboard side, repeat steps 2, 3 and 4.

Step 6.
On the starboard side, locate and remove the transmission cooler plug. The transmission cooler looks like a small can and is located towards the bottom of the bilge near the back of the engine. There is a hose connected to it. Use a 7/16” wrench to remove this plug. The plug is located between the transmission cooler and hose. It is the hose that goes toward the boat, not the rear. The plug faces directly down towards the bilge. You can try to "feel" for the plug before you get your wrench in there. Getting your hand and wrench in there is a tight fit so take your time. Some members also find it easier to just remove the hose clamp that is attached to the transmission cooler (see the picture below). This method works just as well.

http://www.tigeowners.com/tech/images/trancooler1.jpg

http://www.tigeowners.com/tech/images/trancooler2.jpg

If you do not have a heater you can skip this step and call it a day as this is the last step of the winterization process.

Step 7.
Removing the heater hoses and drain the water from the heater core.
Heaters are typically located in the starboard bow storage (in front of drivers side).
Remove the two screw clamps with a screw driver and pull heater hoses off spouts.

http://www.tigeowners.com/tech/images/heater.jpg

Step 8.
Blow compressed air through both hoses. I use my mouth (dont worry its not gonna kill you). You should blow all the water through until you no longer have pressure and can hear the water gurgling down the hoses.

Step 9.
Blow compressed air through the heater spouts. These are the copper tipped pipes. I use a 2 ft spare heater hose that I connect to the spout. You could also use something similar such as a garden hose as long as there is a snug fit. Once attached I blow any additional water out of the heater core. Do this for both spouts. It is possible that you may not need to blow air through the heater core since there is not a lot of water but I like to for peace of mind.

http://www.tigeowners.com/tech/images/heater2.jpg


Step 10.
Open up a beer and sit back and relax as you have just finished a quick winterization.


To “summerize” simply reconnect everything you removed.

chpthril
01-08-2010, 11:20 PM
Glad to see this info all together as a "sticky" now. I would like to add just a couple things.

If you have a Pre-07 Marine Power, it will have only one knock sensor and it will be located on the port side. The starboard side of the engine will have a std brass drain plug.

It's not a bad idea to pull the outlet hose off the top of the impeller housing to let the water drain there. Due to the tight fit of the housing, water can be held on top of the impeller, and not drain when the hose/plug is removed from the transmission cooler.

I highly recommend that once the engine is done draining, which is about 5 minutes, reinstall all plugs and hoses. This way, nothing gets lost or forgotten over the winter months.

Matt Garcia
01-09-2010, 04:35 PM
Mike, thanks for the notes. I figured someone was going to correct me at least a few times, which is a good thing since I knew I would overlook a few things.

If anyone else has any suggestions please post here and I will update the post.


Thanks,
Matt

tige22v
01-09-2010, 09:05 PM
I thought getting the tranny cooler plug off was tough....Until I had to put it back on. :)

sostler
01-26-2010, 09:22 PM
What about the shower hoses? I disconnected mine where they attach to the engine and it was tough. It's just a hose clamp but the hose itself was so tight I had to pry off with a flat head screwdriver and thought I was going to damage the hose itself, just trying to get it off. If it's not needed I will let it go next year. There was a comment about putting things back on after draining. I also have a 24' Rinker, that I have had for 20 years, and last year I thought I would put everything back together so that I was ready in the spring, and there was enough water trapped that it froze and had nowhere to go and cracked the block. So, it may not be a good idea to reconnect until spring. Sostler

Shuswap14
09-13-2010, 06:38 PM
Matt, great post. Up here in Canada, our Tige dealer also runs RV antifreeze through the engine as their last step. I know they need to run the engine to temp to get the thermostat open but Im unclear how to get the antifreeze flowing through. Where is the best place to tie in your garden hose while running the engine and can you pump the antifreeze through the same spot till your sure its full up? Ive got the Mercury Service manual, but cant find anything related to that in it. I have a 98 22i.

wakewilson
09-16-2010, 12:23 PM
I have found it easier to just remove the trans cooler hose and let the water drain there instead of trying to get to the plug. Any reason this shouldn't work?

chpthril
09-16-2010, 12:49 PM
That's the way do it. I found it to be way easier then pulling and reinstalling the plug.

wakewilson
09-16-2010, 05:40 PM
That's right, I think I learned this from you. Thanks.

skippabcool
10-04-2010, 05:19 AM
Newbie question. If I remove the trans cooler hose do I need to do anything on the V drive? I have been searching but have not found anything that says to take any drain plugs out of the V drive.

chpthril
10-04-2010, 10:48 AM
Newbie question. If I remove the trans cooler hose do I need to do anything on the V drive? I have been searching but have not found anything that says to take any drain plugs out of the V drive.

I never bothered to pull the V-drive plug(s). Most of the water drains back out of the scoop once the boat it pulled from the water, or the fake-a-lake is pulled, then draining the trans cooler gets the water out of that side of the system. :02:

CLCrismon
10-07-2010, 03:24 AM
Matt:

In our area, NW Arkansas the shops use antifreeze. If you used antifreeze would you drain everything, put the plugs in and run antifreeze?

Or would you run antifreeze and then drain the system? It seems that the second option is best to me?

Matt Garcia
10-07-2010, 02:46 PM
Matt:

In our area, NW Arkansas the shops use antifreeze. If you used antifreeze would you drain everything, put the plugs in and run antifreeze?

Or would you run antifreeze and then drain the system? It seems that the second option is best to me?

Good question. Unfortunately I dont the right answer on this one as I have never used antifreeze. Hopefully some of the members who use antifreeze can elaborate.

chpthril
10-07-2010, 04:42 PM
Matt:

In our area, NW Arkansas the shops use antifreeze. If you used antifreeze would you drain everything, put the plugs in and run antifreeze?

Or would you run antifreeze and then drain the system? It seems that the second option is best to me?

Draining the antifreeze after running it in is like smoking pot and not inhaling :02: :p

WABoating
10-10-2010, 11:01 PM
I never bothered to pull the V-drive plug(s). Most of the water drains back out of the scoop once the boat it pulled from the water, or the fake-a-lake is pulled, then draining the trans cooler gets the water out of that side of the system. :02:

Caution: If you have a intake strainer (like my boat does), the water might NOT drain back out of the thru-hull scoop. My intake strainer is mounted near the top of the engine compartment, making the v-drive a low point in the system.

When I removed my v-drive's plug, a WHOLE bunch of water came streaming out. I presume I was draining the drive along with both of its hoses; when I later disconnected the hose on the transmission cooler it was basically empty so I think its water flowed out the v-drive. (On the trailer, the v-drive is lower than the cooler.)

The v-drive's drain plug is probably the easiest plug to access, remove, and reinstall. I wouldn't skip it. Just my $0.02.

chpthril
10-11-2010, 12:19 AM
In RED


Caution: If you have a intake strainer (like my boat does), the water might NOT drain back out of the thru-hull scoop. My intake strainer is mounted near the top of the engine compartment, making the v-drive a low point in the system. The trans cooler hosed removed will be as low or lower, so water left between the strainer and cooler will drain out when the cooler hose is removed.

When I removed my v-drive's plug, a WHOLE bunch of water came streaming out. I presume I was draining the drive along with both of its hoses; when I later disconnected the hose on the transmission cooler it was basically empty so I think its water flowed out the v-drive. (On the trailer, the v-drive is lower than the cooler.) If you had pulled the trans cooler hose first, and then the v-drive plugs, you would have gotten very little water out of the plugs. I came to the conclusion that it was not necessary to pull the floor for a basic water drain, after winterizing a number of Tiges. For those that ride year-round, pulling the floor would be a major PITA after each trip out. There is never anything wrong with one fallowing the manufacturers instructions. :02:

The v-drive's drain plug is probably the easiest plug to access, remove, and reinstall. I wouldn't skip it. Just my $0.02.

WABoating
10-11-2010, 01:06 AM
The trans cooler hosed removed will be as low or lower, so water left between the strainer and cooler will drain out when the cooler hose is removed.

As long as you don't lose the syphon. Since the v-drive is the lowest point in that part of the system, the only way to KNOW it's empty is to remove the v-drive's plug.


If you had pulled the trans cooler hose first, and then the v-drive plugs, you would have gotten very little water out of the plugs. I came to the conclusion that it was not necessary to pull the floor for a basic water drain, after winterizing a number of Tiges.

Considering that the v-drive is the low point, I'm not sure you can rely on getting all of the water out by draining solely from a point ABOVE the low point.


For those that ride year-round, pulling the floor would be a major PITA after each trip out.

Totally agree, though if you ride year-around I'm not sure why you'd be emptying your cooling system after each trip out. If the answer is salt water, I would definitely want to be sure all of that had been drained!

BTW, it's not necessary to pull the floor on my boat to do this. The center portion of the rear seat, held in place by four screws and wingnuts, lifts right out to reveal the v-drive while leaving the floor in place:

http://articles.richardhartman.net/wakeboat/winterize/seatremoved.jpg

Four wingnuts and it's out. No carpet strips (it remains attached to the seat section), no floor screws, nothing. The only thing covered by my floor is the fuel tank so there's really no reason to remove it:

http://articles.richardhartman.net/wakeboat/winterize/fueltank.jpg

An alternative to draining the v-drive would be to disconnect the cooler's hose and then dribble some antifreeze into whichever end is higher until it appears out the other end (cooler hose on non-strainer boats, or strainer hose if present). This could be done via the standard access panels and would insure a freezeproof solution was in the v-drive.


There is never anything wrong with one fallowing the manufacturers instructions.

Agreed - and those instructions say to remove the v-drive plug (2009 EX-343 Owner's Manual, page 60):


Remove all the drain plugs from the following
locations:
• Cylinder Block - one on each side (5.0/5.7L
engines, remove the knock sensor on the port
and starboard sides). When installing the
knock sensor, torque to 20 N.m (15 lb ft).
• Exhaust Manifolds - remove hoses and/or
drain plugs, one on each side.
• CES 5.0/5.7L - remove drain plugs, one on
each side, exhaust corners.
• Transmission Cooler - one drain plug.
• (If Equipped) PCM V-Drive Transmission
- one drain plug.

YMMV....

pzbilly
10-11-2010, 09:40 AM
Great very informative

skindog44
10-13-2010, 02:15 AM
where do you locate the v-drive plug if its so easy to access? Thanks! This winterization tip sheet is very helpful!!

WABoating
10-13-2010, 01:37 PM
See that first picture above? That's the v-drive right in the center of the photo, with the big silver thing on its end. The drain plug is immediately below that. You remove and install it with a 1/2 inch ratchet handle (no socket required, it has a square recess).

I should qualify my earlier comment: When I said it was probably the easiest to access, I was thinking of after the seat support had been removed. To winterize my engine, I consider removing that seat support mandatory during winterization because it gives safe access to the oil filter (otherwise the risk of oil spillage goes way up). Once it's out, getting to the v-drive's drain plug is super easy.

Removing the seat support takes a bit longer than removing the engine access panels back in the storage compartments, but isn't bad.

Hope this helps!

seaslush
10-31-2010, 03:49 AM
I have thewinterizer on my boat
no mess in the hull
fast and very easy
the only system I will use from now on...

WABoating
10-31-2010, 11:53 PM
I have thewinterizer on my boat
no mess in the hull
fast and very easy
the only system I will use from now on...

That handles the water. Now all you have left is:

* Winterize fuel system and engine
* Replace oil
* Replace oil filter
* Remove batteries
* Etc.

chpthril
11-01-2010, 12:20 AM
That handles the water. Now all you have left is:

* Winterize fuel system and engine
* Replace oil
* Replace oil filter
* Remove batteries
* Etc.

Removing batteries is not always necessary. The main objective is to keep them charged so they don't freeze.

seaslush
11-01-2010, 12:50 AM
When I read the forum on how some members are winterizing their engines, I just shake my head. Finding drain plugs - warming up the engine - removing the thermostat - mixing antifreeze, etc.. My 140 hp is done in 3 minutes. It takes longer to remove my batteries than to drain the engine. My buddy has twin V6 mercs and it take him less than 10 minutes to drain both engines.
So on the last trip of the year, I add fuel stab (2min), at the end of the run I change the oil and filter (5 min), pull the boat out and wash it off (10 min), drain the engine (3min), pull the battery (I am going to change the location of the battery next year)(5min), clean the inside of the boat (10min), check and grease the outdrive (4min), remove my electronics (3min) and cover (30min). Now I look forward to winterizing my boat because it is so easy to do.

WABoating
11-01-2010, 05:18 PM
Now I look forward to winterizing my boat because it is so easy to do.

Different engines and ease of access makes a big difference. My Mercury 240EFI is fast too:

* Totally self-draining, and I mean TOTALLY. Time to drain: Zero

* 2-stroke operation. Time to change oil and oil filter: Zero

* Change two fuel filters: Five minutes

* Remove battery: Two minutes

So yeah, some engines and boats are easier.

seaslush
11-03-2010, 12:36 AM
the point I want to make is:
there is a system out there that will make the hardest and most important part of winterizing an inboard (the engine) fast and easy.

WABoating
11-03-2010, 04:22 AM
the point I want to make is:
there is a system out there that will make the hardest and most important part of winterizing an inboard (the engine) fast and easy.

The water cooling part of the engine, yes. I'm not sure I'd say that is the hardest part, though. And if you're not in a freezing climate it's not even the most important.

I'm sure it's a very nice product. But it's not anywhere close to being a complete solution for winterization.

skyski_tige
11-05-2010, 04:34 PM
Winterizing -
1. remove passenger access cover
2. place heater in storage area and set to 32 degrees

Done...

skyski_tige
11-05-2010, 04:35 PM
Different engines and ease of access makes a big difference. My Mercury 240EFI is fast too:

* Totally self-draining, and I mean TOTALLY. Time to drain: Zero

* 2-stroke operation. Time to change oil and oil filter: Zero

* Change two fuel filters: Five minutes

* Remove battery: Two minutes

So yeah, some engines and boats are easier.

You can remove your batteries in two minutes - WOW :bo: :bo:

WABoating
11-05-2010, 05:06 PM
Winterizing -
1. remove passenger access cover
2. place heater in storage area and set to 32 degrees

Done, if you aren't worried about changing lubricants and all the other normal maintenance steps as described in the manuals. The whole point of changing lubes at winterization is to prevent water, if any, from sitting in there all those months.

Take good care of your equipment, and it will take good care of you. The opposite is also true.

WABoating
11-05-2010, 05:07 PM
You can remove your batteries in two minutes - WOW

On my 240EFI, yes. It's a single battery and it's super accessible. Loosen the two terminal clamps to remove the cables, loosen the retaining bracket, and it lifts straight up out of the engine compartment. Two minutes.

skyski_tige
11-05-2010, 05:10 PM
Done, if you aren't worried about changing lubricants and all the other normal maintenance steps as described in the manuals. The whole point of changing lubes at winterization is to prevent water, if any, from sitting in there all those months.

Take good care of your equipment, and it will take good care of you. The opposite is also true.

We use our boat year round so the need for winterization is not really there.

skyski_tige
11-05-2010, 05:11 PM
On my 240EFI, yes. It's a single battery and it's super accessible. Loosen the two terminal clamps to remove the cables, loosen the retaining bracket, and it lifts straight up out of the engine compartment. Two minutes.

I have 2 batteries and it looks intense to remove them. I am sure it will be fast.

WABoating
11-05-2010, 06:06 PM
We use our boat year round so the need for winterization is not really there.

So why did you say the following?


Winterizing -
1. remove passenger access cover
2. place heater in storage area and set to 32 degrees
Done...

WABoating
11-05-2010, 06:09 PM
I have 2 batteries and it looks intense to remove them. I am sure it will be fast.

My 24Ve is probably much like your RZ2, and yes it is more difficult. But as noted, I was talking about my 240EFI.

BTW, removing dual batteries isn't all that hard. Remove the access panel, undo the connections, undo the straps, and pull them out.

I recommend using a tyrap or similar device to keep all same-terminal cables associated with each other while the batteries are out. There's a lot of cables under there and it would be easy to mix them up when you reinstall the batteries.

skyski_tige
11-09-2010, 08:42 PM
So why did you say the following?

Just putting what I do in 'Northern' terms... I change fluids when needed but no need to remove water based on freezing...

gfsugar2plus
05-04-2011, 09:43 PM
Matt, great post. Up here in Canada, our Tige dealer also runs RV antifreeze through the engine as their last step. I know they need to run the engine to temp to get the thermostat open but Im unclear how to get the antifreeze flowing through. Where is the best place to tie in your garden hose while running the engine and can you pump the antifreeze through the same spot till your sure its full up? Ive got the Mercury Service manual, but cant find anything related to that in it. I have a 98 22i.

This is a little late but is for others with this question. Here is a video of what I've done. I now use a lot of duct tape to attach the hose. Attachment really depends on the hose you use. Mine is rated for something like 100 psi anti collapse.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UxqU1wjkU_k

topaz surfer
10-08-2011, 04:09 AM
anybody know if this is the same procedure for a 2003 merc mag 350 315hp motor?

chpthril
10-08-2011, 12:57 PM
anybody know if this is the same procedure for a 2003 merc mag 350 315hp motor?

Winterizing any marine inboard and getting any boat ready for winter storage is the same general procedure. So the steps outlined here can be applied to the merc, but some of the details, such as the number of drain plugs and location, will be different.

Fire_medic
03-24-2012, 06:25 PM
I bought my boat in december and had to winterize it when I got it up here to canada from seattle (had it blown out and drained in seattle) After reading the posts now i feel nervous I ran it up to temp. then removed the water that was running into it and just started to pour rv coolant in until it was pure coolant running out the exhaust. I had put fuel stabalizer in while it ran to temp tank was less than 1/4 and I foged the cylinders. Am I going to have problems? or will the cooland go through the tranny and v-drive as well? This is what I did for my older malibu direct drive as well and it worked good. I took the hose off at the inlet on the bottome of the hull where it comes in from the lake and ran it through this hose.